Do you REALLY have a disorder???

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By Kenneth Justice

What does it mean to have a disorder?

According to a psychotherapist I had coffee with recently, “children who are hyperactive should be tested for having ADD or ADHD”.

And how do you identify that the child is hyperactive?” I asked

Well, children who have a difficult time sitting at their desk in school, or staying focused on the task at hand would be examples of hyperactivity” she said

To which I ask….REALLY???

For years I have been challenging the way we live in Western Society; I think many elements of our culture suck;

—-) Too much time is spent in front of the television

—-) Too much time is spent in automobiles

—-) Too many doctors are prescribing pharmaceutical drugs like candy

And,

—-) Not enough time is spent focusing on healthy eating habits

—-) Not enough time is spent walking

—-) Not enough time is spent questioning the status quo we’ve been taught to believe

My latest series of articles have been focusing on mental illness because it’s an easy format to use in questioning the lies that we have been taught to believe. For instance, why should little boys or girls be forced to sit at desks for hours on end? Is that healthy? Perhaps little boys and girls were meant to run around all day and use up all that energy and creativity that is bursting beneath the surface. Children love to explore their environment by walking through the woods, turning over rocks in the river or creek, and climbing trees.

Why are there practically NO schools that have ever questioned the logic in forcing elementary children to sit in drab classrooms and stare at a blackboard all day? And instead of questioning the way ‘we do school’ in Western Culture, instead, when the little boy or girl doesn’t sit still for hours on end the teacher tells the parent that they should be tested for over-hyperactivity, “Perhaps your child should be on Ritalin to calm them down” the teacher says.

I am suggesting that we as a people literally tear down the fabric of the current establishment; all of those engrained beliefs we’ve been taught to hold dear…..need to be torn to shreds. We need to start over.

I recently had coffee with a mid-fortyish gentleman who was complaining about anxiety and stress in his life, “How often are you outside breathing in fresh air?” I asked him

He laughed, “Well I have a garage so when I leave to work in the morning I never even have to step outside; I get into my car, drive to work, than I usually come home in the evening. The only fresh air I get is on Saturday if I decide to do any work around the yard, and most Saturdays I’m so exhausted from the work week that I spend the day inside watching television” he said

Am I the only one that questions a lifestyle where someone goes five consecutive days without ever being outside for any length of time? Am I the only person in Western Society who has experienced the calming effect of spending an hour at midday walking through the woods or along a river and enjoying the beauty of nature?

It can be uncomfortable to talk about pharmaceutical drugs, mental illness, and our lifestyle because these issues are extremely personal. It can be difficult to discuss the subject of the way we do life in Western Society because from a very young age we have been force-fed the idea that ‘Western Culture is a supreme society, we are better than those damn third world countries”. However, as I’ve written about places like Costa Rica, it is actually in many of those third world countries where people experience a higher level of happiness, contentment, and much lower rates of anxiety and stress.

The way we do life here in Western Culture needs to be reevaluated.

But Kenneth, how do we even begin to change the status quo? If I agree with you that spending too much time in our automobiles is hazardous to our health, and that little children should spend more time outside of the classroom than sitting at desks….what can we really do?

It’s not going to be easy. Challenging the institution and establishments can be daunting to even consider. Entire college degree programs and industry have built around the lies we’ve been taught to believe.

My people perish for lack of knowledge

The first step is considering the possibility that we have been lied to and that the educational system around us needs to be reevaluated. The second step is continuing this discussion; whether via the Internet, in person-to-person conversations, on radio shows, or in any platform possible.

The third step, if you so desire, is to stay tuned to The Culture Monk Website where I’ll be continuing this topic for the next few days. At the risk of losing readers, I believe so strongly that Western Culture needs a facelift that I’ve dedicated the next few days to this theme.

For now, I think I’m going to finish this cup of coffee,

Kenneth

—> if you haven’t heard I’m co-hosting a weekly podcast with my good friend Kylie, check it out at www.kennyandkylie.com

—> My sincerest apologies to all my awesome readers for being so behind in responding to comments and emails. The last few weeks has seen a massive increase in work related responsibilities, and the emails and comments I’ve been receiving has practically doubled over night. I hope to be caught up in the upcoming weeks. I am EXTREMELY thankful for every comment and email receive and I read EVERY SINGLE ONE OF THEM. The success of the Culture Monk Blog owes directly to all of the great comments and discussion that occurs beyond my articles. Thank you! Again…. even though I’ve been behind on responding to emails and comments, I READ EVERY SINGLE ONE, thank you so much!!!



Categories: Culture & Society

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52 replies

  1. Reblogged this on This Got My Attention and commented:
    Great points!

  2. After I retired from teaching, I did try tutoring.It was one of those business model places, where they sell the parents on quantified score increases. They put me in with the youngest children because I was sweet. Imagine an active boy being forced to sit in tutoring AFTER a whole day of being stuck in a classroom. I made it about 3 months and I was so convinced this was child abuse, that I quit. Those kids needed to be outside, exploring. They were like caged animals. I think their parent should be made to take meds to chill out. These kids were normal and very active.

  3. I do think we prescribe all too often, and that actually makes it more difficult for the people who actually have a genuine chemical imbalance. People who actually need that medicine don’t want it because of stigma. There are times when medication is appropriate, but because it’s so over prescribed they refuse to seek help.
    Also, why is “sex” tagged on this post?

    • lol Kira, its a private joke between a blogger friend and mine…..i’m surprised you even noticed! Ha ha….

      I’ll email you about it later… although it will probably be not as funny to a third party 🙂

  4. Uh, Costa Rica is part of Western Culture, by any rational standards. Maybe you mean US culture?

  5. Ritalin (methylphenidate) is a form of speed. The US government classifies it as a Schedule II psychoactive drug comparable with cocaine and morphine because it is highly addictive. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) requires a “black box” warning on all methylphenidate drugs, including Ritalin, which means that medical studies indicate Ritalin carries a significant risk of serious, or even life-threatening, adverse effects.

    Subjecting small chidren to a drug that can result in lifelong addiction is reminiscent of Victorian parents giving gin, or Laundanum (a tincture of opium and alcohol), to children in order to get them to sleep.

    Obviously, most parents cannot made fully aware of research and the dangers involved. If they are aware, they probably need strong medication themselves.

  6. Kenneth, I invite you and your readers to go for a hike. http://wp.me/p3izEO-r9
    It is good for your soul.

  7. For a short time I was privileged to work in Early Childhood Mental Health. I was part of a community Mental Health Center, that wasn’t that great, but this program was. I went into the schools and the homes so that I could actually change something. The teachers were wonderful and, for the most part, did everything they could to keep kids off medications. They gave breaks, special learning spaces, adapted learning to each child and anything else we could think of to help the child learn. Sometimes it wasn’t enough. Sometimes the parents would not cooperate. Mostly though, parents did not want their children on medications either. The really awful part of the program: all the kids aged out at 5. So there were no services in school or home after that. It was all office based. That changes everything. I don’t know if the adaptations continued in school. I do know that the parents at least had some knowledge of how to change things and how to advocate for their children. Maybe that is the difference the program made. Of course the grant ended, and along with it the program. What a loss.

  8. It’s good to talk about this, people need to realize that they can make this choice for themselves. And that’s really where it needs to start, with individuals.

  9. I’m with you, Kenny! So much in our culture needs to be changed! I’ve written a lot about the things I have seen (my husband and I have committed to being an “out-of-the-ordinary” American family, challenging the system in the way we choose to live), and I would love to help out any way I can. Thank you for your courage.

  10. I hate elementary school, I felt it was torture for my son, who wants to learn and use his gross motor skills, to have to sit still for hours at a time – it doesn’t seem natural to me! I can’t wait to hear your ideas!

  11. Keep this topic going, there needs to be more discussion about how broken the system is. The Current, a local MPR station, is actually doing their next “policy and a pint” discussion about how the education system is outdated and does not benefit students. This is becoming more and more of a known issue and that is the only way we will be able to get anything changed. As long as people stay quiet there is no incentive to do anything about it, we need voices screaming that we need to re-evaluate the way we do education if we want things to improve. I have plenty of ideas for ways to overhaul the education system but until there is an audience for them, they won’t help.

  12. It’s not surprising your readership has increased. You are interesting, your writing flows well, and your easy to read. Plus you’re a likeable, friendly person. I’m happy for you.
    Again today you’ve touched on something I have some experience with. My son and I both are ADD w/o hyperactivity. We are easily distracted, have learning disabilities and trouble attending. We fit outside the “norm” and is why I related to yesterday’s blog.
    As a child I didn’t buzz about like a hyperactive child, but quietly wandering around the classroom, looking over people’s shoulders to see what they were doing, stared out the window, etc. Because I was quiet and lethargic, and didn’t cause any trouble, most of my teachers let me go. Back then we didn’t medicate kids.
    When my son got to school and started the same thing the teachers suggested he go to the doctor. The doctor put him on Ritalin and he really did start buzzing around in circles. So the doctor said, ‘Take him off. He is reacting like a “normal child” would to Ritalin. Ritalin slows hyperactive children down and speeds “normal children” up’. My son tried other meds with no success. The school was way off about what was wrong and at a lose to help him fit into the “norm”. Finally we put him into private school and he barely graduated. If I could have found the magic pill I would have gladly given it to him. Later he and I both found antidepressants the most helpful. Who would have thought!? But we still have learning disabilities, and a few other things that just makes life hard. And I’d have to say it’s mostly because we don’t fit into what’s “normal” that has made life hard.

    • Our society is so completely focused on ONE method of learning, and ONE type of ‘smarts’ that those who have other types are labeled as learning disabled. You and your son simply haven’t found a vocation that suits you. Only in the last 100 years has this Western type of education really taken hold.
      Do you really think the average housewife of 200 years ago was stupid? She may have been illiterate (though that’s not likely given the economic importance of domestic economy) but she certainly was extremely learned. And skilled. She had to be to run a household. That, however, is not something that our culture values any more. She was a master at many trades, and performed many of them in a single day, as did her husband and children. Yet we have this persistent view of those families from the past as uneducated and backward.
      Who is backward? The woman who can provide for her family by growing food, preparing meals, making clothing, cleaning, budgeting well but maybe doesn’t read so well, or the woman who makes $150,000 per year but can’t cook a simple meal, clean her house, get stains out of laundry, sew, or change a tire? Personally I vote for the second. THAT is illiteracy of the most dire sort.

  13. Who wouldn’t agree more with you. Talking to one another surely is the human’s problem solution. It’s always more than one cockroaches though.lol Hopefully the western culture will break this habit of life style; healthier , longer life.
    I like your humor and laughs in your podcast 🙂

  14. A good article once more. I will challenge you on this becareful on using sweeping terms. Not all things western are bad some should be scrapped altogether while other items need tweeking and still yet others items need a complete overhaul. Your overall premise is correct in my estimation.

  15. I couldn’t agree with you more…we need to tear it down! Teaching in public school for 7 years, I saw the huge disservice we’re doing to a frightening number of children. 😦 It factored into our decision to home school Grace quite a bit. Now she starts her school days in the sunshine…literally. (Well, unless it’s raining.) 😉

  16. Reblogged this on Price is Truth and commented:
    Well written post about a topic that hits close to home for me personally. My own struggles with adhd have impacted my life but right now I have chosen not to treat my condition with medication.

    Exercise and therapy are my current methods of trying to manage. While not always successful, I prefer not to succumb to over-medication.

  17. Excellent post. Reblogged on Price is Truth

  18. What a breath of fresh air your blog posts are, especially this one. Keep up the topic- I love reading your perspective and couldn’t agree more!

  19. “For instance, why should little boys or girls be forced to sit at desks for hours on end? Is that healthy? Perhaps little boys and girls were meant to run around all day and use up all that energy and creativity that is bursting beneath the surface. Children love to explore their environment by walking through the woods, turning over rocks in the river or creek, and climbing trees.”

    Yeah, that is what I enjoy doing. Why not let them play more? Is everything in school that essential?

    I think we can change the culture. It got this way because of people’s decisions. It can be reversed in the same way. I don’t think that you will lose as many readers as you will gain by questioning all the lies we have been believing. That is what I have been doing with my blog too.

  20. It seems US culture is more understanding of the nature of our pet dogs than of our children. Cesar Milan (the “Dog Whisperer”) makes a lot of shows (and money!) teaching dog owners how to provide the activities and environment that’s healthiest for their particular dog’s breed/temperament. The owners seem to understand that these things make for happier, calmer, more manageable pets. Why aren’t PARENTS thinking like this?!?! Or have I opened a nasty can of worms in directly comparing our children to animals even though pill-producing science shows us just how biological humans really are?

  21. My teenage daughter said to me this morning something I think all of us have thought once upon a time. It seems trivial but it goes deeply into choices and what we have made society. Why did it all happen?
    She said: ‘Why don’t we all just decide that we will have a two day work week and a 5 day weekend.?’
    Illogical? I think (KNOW) she meant… I get the work – but not the grind – where are we all racing off too?
    My simple answer was: ‘selfish greed, my love, put us all in this spot we are in now’
    How do we change that culture. HELL I hope you have the answers dude!
    Excellent post!!! Bravo –
    reblog if I may?

  22. I agree wholeheartedly, but maybe fore a different reason. There ARE mental problems that require serious attention and, in some cases, maybe even medication. I’d argue that ADD and such are phenomena that exist and, while medication may not always be the right answer, children and adults with such mental differences need to handled in a different way. What I mean is, like autistic children you talked about yesterday, they may learn a bit differently. They may socialize a bit differently. They need to be made to know that they are not broken, there is not something wrong with them and that they can learn and succeed the same as their peers. Just because they may have to learn and achieve differently doesn’t mean their knowledge and achievements are any less valuable to society.

    But the big thing is, over diagnosis and over medicating lumps a lot of kids who may not actually have those problems with children who really need help. The children who really need help with these issues get lost in the shuffle. Sometimes, they never get any help because parents are too afraid of a stigma and sometimes they get just enough help to know there’s allegedly something wrong (by which I mean they are told their wrong instead of just being told they’re different) with them without being given any tools to help them succeed.

  23. Couldn’t agree more!

    Kids are BORED in school…so drug them, there I said it.

    I know of many cases where the curriculum was changed to suit the child (which in most cases involved kids working with their hands and actually doing something instead of just listening, or it involved kids being taught something they were interested in) and…voilà, end of problem!

    Good post Kenneth.

    ~ Dave

  24. I love it and I couldn’t agree with you more. If you’ve got 20 minutes to spare and haven’t already seen it, this TedTalks by Ken Robinson on how the current educational system kills creativity and isn’t conducive to helping each individual child reach their full potential is fantastic! It’s well worth the 20 minutes! https://www.ted.com/talks/ken_robinson_says_schools_kill_creativity#

  25. Mme. Ross and I are still considering whether to homeschool our daughter and future children just to make sure that they’re better prepared for the real world, given my stumbling with common culture as a teenager. I think taking field trips to the river and the park and the zoo is much better for her than sitting at a desk all day anyway and hey — isn’t science starting to point out that sitting a lot can kill a person?

  26. I agree with you completely. My point is always that our modern problems have their roots hundreds of years deep. Everything is built on a foundation, and the errors of today find their foundation being laid even a thousand years ago. Irv

  27. I totally agree! There are some kids who are genuinely hyperactive and need help HOWEVER, I think those kids are much more in the minority than we believe. I think if kids are more hyper than before it’s about a lot of things – it’s about what is IN our food (red dyes, etc.), it’s about kids being exposed to television and other electronics for lengthy periods of time (technology is becoming the babysitter) and those things stimulate the brain so they’re wired and ready to go, etc. Those two topics alone bring up many other topics to discuss – the food part brings up talking about Monsanto, etc. Oh lordy it gets to be a lot. I do think a lot of changes can be made a bit more simply – it doesn’t have to be grand. It’s just taking a few minutes to unplug from technology a day; it means taking a little extra time at the store to buy better food (okay yes this sucks and I don’t wanna do it either BUT if it translates into better health, feeling better, etc., – it’s well worth it); it means talking a 30 min lunch break at the park, or whatever. If each person does a little bit, it translates into big things and big accomplishments. The hard part is getting everyone on board lol. I think we’re getting there. It does take time and it takes a lot of effort but again if it’s looked at in smaller bits, it’s a lil’ less overwhelming. Hope you’re doing well! Don’t be working too hard. 🙂

  28. I think we need a revolution – One primarily focused on this greed problem.
    Sounds like you are talking about “The Default Life”


    One addition:
    —) Not Enough time spent sleeping

  29. Just wanted to let you know, I read this outside.

  30. Don’t get me started on “hyperactivity” labels…my post would be too long. In a nutshell, What you said…

    For years I have been challenging the way we live in Western Society; I think many elements of our culture suck;

    —-) Too much time is spent in front of the television

    —-) Too much time is spent in automobiles

    —-) Too many doctors are prescribing pharmaceutical drugs like candy

    And,

    —-) Not enough time is spent focusing on healthy eating habits

    —-) Not enough time is spent walking

    —-) Not enough time is spent questioning the status quo we’ve been taught to believe

  31. Kenneth, I don’t see how bringing up relevant points about troubles of society that affect nearly all of us is a risk to your readership. I hope it only strengthens it, as you present these ideas in what comes across to me as an easy-to-understand way.

  32. nope, you’re not the only one! really 😉
    hear, hear, here, here

  33. Heck, you’ve got my attention. I sooooo totally agree. Kids are meant to play and explore and discover life. Not have it shoved into them through a teacher in a class room. Man, wouldn’t that be awesome if schools were way more hands-on? My inlaws have a mango tree in their yard, and my kids, especially my son used to love climbing up on it. Whenever we go back to our home base, my son absolutely loves it. It’s a huge hilly area and there’s a lake and he just runs and runs and plays and runs some more. So good for him.
    Looking forward to these posts Kenneth.
    🙂

  34. On the fresh air aspect, yes, I agree. Drugs? Well, I read a book on madness. The tendency to prescribe drugs is increasing. This is terrible. It will be one of the things that will kill us

  35. Reblogged this on Gr8ful Bugger and commented:
    “Why are there practically NO schools that have ever questioned the logic in forcing elementary children to sit in drab classrooms and stare at a blackboard all day? And instead of questioning the way ‘we do school’ in Western Culture, instead, when the little boy or girl doesn’t sit still for hours on end the teacher tells the parent that they should be tested for over-hyperactivity, “Perhaps your child should be on Ritalin to calm them down” the teacher says.

    I am suggesting that we as a people literally tear down the fabric of the current establishment; all of those engrained beliefs we’ve been taught to hold dear…..need to be torn to shreds. We need to start over.”

  36. Great thinking, again! I just wrote about culture change at Insight Out, http://iamginamarie.wordpress.com/2014/05/21/equality-and-equity/
    Balance and whole person interest and focus is important for education, healthy identity, and relationships. I don’t think medication should be eliminated though, nor should all learning be outside and incidental but we are definitely more focussed on academia and accepting what someone else says, rather than teaching our children and each other to be seekers and learners for all of life.

  37. Love your article! We all need to question ourselves a little more and question what long term benefit these types of diagnosis have. I work with many clients trying finally to free themselves and regain their power – that they gave away upon their diagnosis. I too question the needs behind our want for a diagnosis, especially when it is not even for ourselves. And under our systems a diagnosis is usually a life sentence.

  38. Well, the debate on overdiagnosis of ADD/ADHD has raged for at least two decades, Kenneth. I don’t doubt that it has indeed been the case– I heard too many horror stories from friends in the teaching profession. However, I think it’s a legitimate diagnosis for my family– there’s a blanket solid history of it on my wife’s side.

    Does that make sense? Granted, for my son– there was some pressure from my son’s teacher. But… he’s in a self-contained classroom for autism services, with the same teacher he had in kindergarten, and for a long time, I was talking with her almost every single day. When she told me that she felt other symptomatic behavior was delaying his progress– and it didn’t seem to relate to his autism– I took that very seriously.

    I’ve been through the wringer on psychiatric meds, including Ritalin. So I don’t take this stuff lightly one bit. I was very hesitant when my daughter started, but, she had the opportunity to take ownership for her treatment and I honestly wouldn’t have it any other way.

    So I don’t want to see overdiagnosis and pill popping. I remember the “Vitamin R” years too, when college students when I was doing undergrad were popping them. What I am for is responsible, informed treatment– where we as individuals are given choices.

    You know I ain’t gonna bulls*** you on this one, Kenneth.

  39. Kenneth, this post is preaching to the choir!! I am a lifelong “sufferer” of ADHD. I was diagnosed at the age of 8 by an educational psychiatrist, after driving my elderly third-grade teacher crazy with my antics. I was also diagnosed as gifted that same year. Those of us with ADD and ADHD are wired differently, but I don’t really see it as a disorder. My brain moves very rapidly; and that’s what I’m used to. However, its rapid movements are productive. I just need lots of change to stay engaged.
    Ironically, I spent 16 years as a third-grade teacher. Teaching elementary school is quite an opportunity for one with ADHD, as the average eight year-old and I have nearly the same attention span! Lessons are short and subjects are changed every 30 to 45 minutes which suited me, and them well. Because I still remembered the difficulty that I experienced sitting all day long, my lessons had movement and were often very hands on. I often had ADHD, ADD and learning disabled students placed in my classroom because of my teaching style. I was never able to tolerate medication, and I was very open to working with un-medicated students. There are so many little ways to keep them on track, that I knew from experience. I am open to medication, but only when nothing else will work. I personally know that it doesn’t make you feel well and luckily my parents weren’t big proponents of it.
    Excellent post!

  40. Enjoyed this! 😀 Have you ever heard of everydaysociologyblog.com?

  41. “Man was not made to live a sedentary life”. He was made to move and use all of his/her senses.

    Perhaps the starting point to changing the current inactive lifestyle, is for parents to reduce the expectations of their babies, toddlers and young children. Let them indulge in fantasy and outdoor play (even when it’s raining or cold). Nothing beats lively activity to get the blood circulating and stimulating brain activity.

    For goodness sake, let them be Children.

    Many a proud parent boasts that their child can read/write before they even start school, but how many can kick a football or make mud pies? Normal rough and tumble never hurt us when we were young. And if they don’t eat all their food at mealtimes, give them smaller meals (until their taste buds develop and their activity level make them hungry). Set good example as parents or carers. Take them for walks and to the local park (if you have one). Let them ‘shop’ and pay for small items. Let them cook or assist you in some craft or building task.

    Creative play doesn’t have to always be outdoors or in the country.

    What happened to the old-fashioned games that involved counting, reading, using your imagination, team work and nature study? What happened to painting, drawing, reading a book to children each night at bed time. And don’t tell me there isn’t time to read your child a book – all you have to do is limit TV, computer and other technology. There’s plenty of time to educate them and teach them self discipline and good study habits as time goes by in their school years.

    And if your child is really hyperactive, stop giving them so much sugar laced foods, guarana based canned drinks or processed food. A guarana based can of soft drink is equal to about 6 cups of strong black coffee – no wonder teens are hyped up and can’t concentrate.

  42. I have really enjoyed the last few posts about mental health and medication. I would love to see more of that or even some recommendations of literature or other mediums to further investigate these issues. Besides my own recent experiences with medication, I am a Teaching Associate who works with children with special needs; I have seen the harm societies attitude on medication and mental health has caused.

  43. An overhaul of education is long overdue and the average western lifestyle is a perverse thing I agree, but you need to be careful about suggesting riverside walks and forest rambling are a panacea for mental illness. There is no amount of healthy eating and rambling that will deal with my Bipolar Disorder and without the antipsychotics I’m on now I would probably be psychotic or dead.

    Had my illness been identified earlier its course may have been altered significantly and I may not have required the treatment I am currently under. If you have 20 kids sat at desks, and one is behaving in a way that prompts the question to be asked about their mental health – it can only be a good thing. A lack of awareness about genuine illness is the reason there are so many suicides and undiagnosed people suffering needlessly.

    All the best,
    H&J

    • I would like to add that while ADHD is certainly overdiagnosed in some situations, it is also tragically underdiagnosed in others. People of colour are often not diagnosed when they should be – they are given other diagnoses instead – and women tend to be missed, especially if they have Inattentive ADHD (like me). And if you do well in school? Forget about it.

      I was diagnosed when I was 28 years old and had to find a new doctor because he didn’t believe I could possibly have ADHD since I did well in school. Meanwhile, my life was falling apart and I am being perfectly honest when I state that I would not be around today if I had not received medication to help treat my symptoms. A year and a half later, I was diagnosed with depression and again, medication saved my life. I am currently medication-free but I will go back on ADHD meds in a heartbeat if my symptoms get too much for the symptoms I’ve got going right now and adjustments aren’t working anymore.

      I think this post of mine might be useful here: http://disabilitythoughts.wordpress.com/2014/02/28/whats-in-a-label/

  44. God is there and he made the rain to fall on the just and unjust for a reason.
    Hope your time off helps and fills your needs and happiness 🙂

  45. Reblogged this on lifestyle warbler and commented:
    Amazing post. I have a mental health background and I do believe it is time someone spoke up on the lies that are said to people in order to sell drugs. Mental illness is still a mystery and any improvement or not cannot be quantified or qualified scientifically. Good area to off load ineffective and dangerous drugs. Mentally ill people are also the last sort of people who would protest. Any concerns of theirs can be passed off as another sign of illness.

  46. Amazing post. I have a mental health background and I do believe it is time someone spoke up on the lies that are said to people in order to sell drugs. Mental illness is still a mystery and any improvement or not cannot be quantified or qualified scientifically. Good area to off load ineffective and dangerous drugs. Mentally ill people are also the last sort of people who would protest. Any concerns of theirs can be passed off as another sign of illness.

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